Nutrition Action November 2010 : Page 13

E A T I N G O U T S U R V I V A L G U I D E Keep in mind that these numbers apply to full-size s soups, sandwiches, and salads, not the Kee smaller “You Pick Two” sizes.Within each section, foods are ranked from least to most calories, then saturated fat, then sodium. Signature Sandwiches Napa Almond Chicken Salad Asiago Roast Beef Chicken Caesar Bacon Turkey Bravo Chipotle Chicken Italian Combo Cafe Sandwiches Smoked Turkey Breast Tuna Salad Mediterranean Veggie Smoked Ham& Swiss Sierra Turkey Signature Hot Panini Smokehouse Turkey Turkey Artichoke Tomato &Mozzarella Frontega Chicken Cuban Chicken Cafe Salads (ranked with dressing—3 Tbs.) Classic with Balsamic Vinaigrette Greek with Greek Dressing Caesar with Caesar Dressing 690 29 4.5 1,200 690 48 14 1,270 720 43 10 1,270 830 53 10 3,010 990 53 15 2,170 1,040 61 17 3,080 560 35 590 20 610 22 2 2,040 5 1,160 3.5 1,450 710 45 10 2,440 970 41 11 2,050 720 53 12 2,540 750 42 770 30 10 1,290 860 46 40 170 160 380 2 2 8 8 240 11 390 12 0 7 2,420 9 2,150 870 47 11 1,890 30 1.5 270 4 1,290 8 1,670 5 8 430 610 Signature Salads (ranked with dressing—3 Tbs.) Asian Sesame Chicken with Asian Sesame Vinaigrette BBQ Chopped Chicken 310 31 400 31 330 30 with BBQ Ranch Dressing and BBQ Sauce 500 31 Chopped Chicken Cobb with Herb Vinaigrette Grilled Chicken Caesar with Caesar Dressing Fuji Apple Chicken Soups (Bowl—12 oz.) Chicken Noodle Garden Vegetable with Pesto Black Bean Chicken Tortilla French Onion Broccoli Cheddar Creamof Chicken &Wild Rice Baked Potato New England ClamChowder Sides Apple Potato Chips French Baguette Slice Whole Grain Baguette Slice 110 160 280 38 500 38 360 36 510 37 370 32 withWhite Balsamic Fuji Apple Vinaigrette 520 32 8 5 170 10 190 10 240 9 290 12 320 10 340 450 80 160 180 190 0 2 6 8 Daily Limits (for a 2,000-calorie diet): Sodium: 1,500 milligrams. Saturated Fat: 20 grams. Source: company information. The use of information from this article for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited without written permission from CSPI. 2.5 420 3.5 810 1 3 5 9 1,120 6 9 640 820 4.5 510 7 830 1.5 1,360 0 1,240 1.5 1,590 1.5 1,110 5 2,210 9 1,540 7 1,270 7 11 1,210 8 20 1,190 0 1 0 0 0 130 440 410 290 770 740 With 234 outlets na-W tionwide, Au Bon Pain seems quick lunches in down-specialize tionw qu places with crowds of town areas, airports, and other people in a hurry. Locations in some cities are required to post calories on their menu boards, and most outlets have a kiosk where you can look up Nutrition Facts. Soups. You’ve got to give Au Bon Pain credit. The chain has three soups—Southwest Vegeta-ble, Tomato Basil Bisque, and Mediterranean Pepper—with roughly 400 to 600 milligrams of sodium in a medium (12 oz.) serving. The only catch (other than the 5 grams of saturated fat in the bisque): the chain rotates its soups, so the menu may not have the low-er-sodium soup you want when you want it. Sandwiches. Like Panera, Au Bon Pain offers several sandwiches—like the Chicken Salad, Chipotle Chicken, and Spicy Tuna—that put a lid on saturated fat. So do wraps like Thai Peanut Chicken and Mayan Chicken. That’s because they’re the only sandwiches or wraps with no cheese. Since when does every sandwich—from turkey and chicken to roast beef and steak—need cheese? But even if you minimize the sat fat, your arteries and waist Minimize the dressing to trim the salt on a Thai Peanut Chicken Salad. will have to handle 1,000 to 2,000 mg of sodium and 500 to 800 calories. And that includes the healthy-sounding Mediter-ranean and Southwest TunaWraps, which come in white-flour lavash wrappers. You’re better off with a 560-calorie Au Bon Pain spicy Black Bean Burger than a 540-calorie Big Mac from the Golden Arches, which has double the sat fat. But Au Bon Pain’s 560-calorie Roast Beef with Brie is essentially a Big Mac with an extra 350 mg of sodium. Our advice: If a salad won’t do, order a sandwich with little or no cheese on (whole wheat) multigrain bread. Better yet, get half a sandwich (or save half of your whole sand-wich for tomorrow). You can dodge the salti-est sandwiches by skipping ham, pastrami, bacon, or other processed meats. But the only way to really take down the sodium is to eat less sandwich. > > > > > NUTRITION ACTION HEALTHLETTER ■ NOVEMBER 2010 13 Photo: Stephen Schmidt. Calories Protein (g) Saturated Fat (g) Sodium (mg) Calories Protein (g) Saturated Fat (g) Sodium (mg)

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